Appreciate Italian Sculpture at Museo Pietro Canonica

Even though I just got back from a wonderful trip to Florida, I’m still feeling the travel bug! What I’m wanderlusting over is Europe (again) with its quaint architecture, colorful culture, and classic history. So as a temporary fix, I’ll share more from my last summer’s tour of Europe, as I never finished posting about all the cities/places. A trove of pictures have been sitting on my computer, untouched, for half a year! Time to continue the adventure since The Pantheon in Rome at Museo Pietro Canonica:

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese

I chanced upon this museum tucked away while wandering in Villa Borghese, Rome’s large central park. To my delight, the museum was free, so why not go in for a quick look…

As it turned out, the museum housed the works of the sculptor Pietro Canonica (1869-1959). “He made an impression in high aristocratic circles and was invited to all the courts of Europe, who competed to commission commemorative works from him” (Source). That was no joke; he created the busts of many aristocratic figures from Buckingham Palace to the court of the Tsar.

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
I am kicking myself for waiting sooo long to write these posts because now I cannot remember what these works are titled!
Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
Don’t underestimate this one. This statue was HUGE. Imagine the work that was put into that!

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese

The war memorials honouring the dead of the first world war in many italian piazzas are the work of Pietro Canonica.

I was most impressed by his technical skill, attention to detail, and sculptures’ realism.

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
Would you look at that detail?!

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese

His work is so lifelike that I literally jumped when I walked into this room of Jesuses. I thought the kneeling Jesus was a real person next to me!

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese

Another really cool part about this museum is that you can see the artist’s private apartment wing. “The oldest wing of the building is the apartment in which Pietro Canonica lived and worked from the 16th August 1927 until the 8th June 1959, the day on which he died.”

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
The studio

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese

Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
I was most fascinated by the artist’s tools. This was all he used to create “life” out of stone?
Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
The room of the fireplace
Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
The bedroom
Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
The lunchroom
Museo Pietro Canonica Rome Villa Borghese
Corridor first floor

Pro tips for visiting Museo Pietro Canonica:

  • It’s free, so definitely stop to take a look!
  • The museum was also very uncrowded when I visited on a weekday. This was a refreshing change of pace (especially if you came from somewhere like the Vatican Museum). You’ll have plenty of room to wander about and take pictures.
  • The museum is inside Villa Borghese park. You can find more practical information on how to get there on the museum’s website.
  • Take a walk around the rest of the park when you’re done! There’s a fantastic viewpoint that overlooks Piazza del Popolo.
Villa Borghese Piazza del Popolo
Piazza del Popolo

Villa Borghese Piazza del Popolo

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Have you been to this museum? Or Villa Borghese? What was your favorite feature inside the park (as I understand it, they also have a zoo)?

Thanks for reading!

P.S. Find more exciting Roman reads here!